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How much is Sully Sullenberger’s net worth? Captain’s Bio: Flight, Book, Alive, Family, Hudson River

How much is Sully Sullenberger’s net worth? Captain’s Bio: Flight, Book, Alive, Family, Hudson River 2018: Wiki, Married, Family, Wedding, Salary, Siblings

Sully Sullenberger net worth is
$1.6 million

Sully Sullenberger Wiki/Biography

Chesley Burnett Sullenberger III, better known in the media as Sully Sullenberger, was born on the 23rd January 1951, in Denison, Texas USA, and is a retired airline captain, certainly best recognized for saving 155 people on the 15th January 2009, when he landed a US Airbus A320 on the Hudson River in New York City, after the plane was disabled by striking a flock of Canada geese. He is now also known as a speaker on airline safety.

So, have you ever wondered how rich Sully Sullenberger is, as of early 2018? According to authoritative sources, it has been estimated that the total size of Sully’s net worth is over $1.6 million, accumulated through his successful career as an airline captain.

Sully Sullenberger Net Worth $1.6 million

Sully Sullenberger was raised with a sister by his father, Chesley Burnett Sullenberger, who was a dentist, and his mother, Marjorie Pauline, who worked as a teacher in an elementary school. As a young boy, he built various models of aircrafts and planes, then when he was 12 years old, he became a member of Mensa International, reflecting his high IQ. He attended Denison High School, from which he matriculated in 1969, meantime at the age of 16, Sully learnt to fly an Aeronca 7DC with a local flight instructor, which definitely influenced his choice of career.

In 1969, he enrolled into the US Air Force Academy and by the end of the year became an instructor glider pilot. Four years later, he graduated with a B.S. degree and won the Outstanding Cadet in Airmanship award, as the class’s “top flyer”. Right after graduation, he was sent to Purdue University to continue his education, earning his MA degree in Industrial Psychology, before he joined the Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) at Columbus AFB, Mississippi. Thus, his career really began in 1973, as a fighter pilot in the US Air Force, staying in that position until 1980, flying Vietnam-era F-4 Phantom II jets. During his service, Sully became a flight leader as well as training officer, and reached the rank of captain, with a lot of experience at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, and in Europe and the Pacific. He also worked as a Blue Force Mission Commander in Red Flag Exercises. His service added considerably to his net worth.

From 1980 to 2010, Sully worked as a commercial pilot for Pacific Southwest Airlines (now US Airways), increasing his net worth by a large margin. Moreover, he worked as the Air Line Pilots Association safety chairman, an accident investigator and instructor. In 2007 he established Safety Reliability Methods, Inc. (SRM), serving as its CEO. However, Sully earned worldwide popularity in January of 2009, when he saved 155 lives by completing a faultless water landing of US Airbus A320 on the Hudson River, after the plane was disabled by striking a flock of Canada geese – not one person on board was injured.

Thanks to his courage, Sully was rewarded with numerous recognitions, including a Masters Medal by the Guild of Air Pilots and Air Navigators in 2009, the Medal of Valor by San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District, the Founders’ Medal by The Air League, among others.

To speak further, his memoir entitled “Highest Duty: My Search For What Really Matters” was published in 2009, and the 2016 film “Sully”, starring Tom Hanks in the title role and directed by Clint Eastwood, is based on the book. So, his net worth is certainly still rising.

Regarding to his personal life, Sully Sullenberger has been married to fitness instructor Lorrie Sullenberger since 1989; the couple has two daughters together. Their current residence is in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Full NameChesley Sullenberger
Net Worth$1.6 million
Date Of Birth23 January 1951
Place Of BirthDenison, Texas USA
Height1.83 m
ProfessionAviator
EducationUniversity of Northern Colorado, United States Air Force Academy, Purdue University, Denison High School
NationalityAmerican
SpouseLorrie Sullenberger
ChildrenKelly Sullenberger, Katie Sullenberger
ParentsPauline Hanna Sullenberger, Chesley Burnett Sullenberger Jr.
SiblingsMary Wilson
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/sully
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/captsully
Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/captsully/
LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/sullysullenberger
IMDBhttps://www.imdb.com/name/nm3314810
AwardsAmerican Spirit Award- Medal of Honor Gala - Congressional Medal of Honor recipients "In the Company of Heroes"
MoviesSully (2016), Daddy's Home 2 (2017), Horizon (1964), Sully: Sully Sullenberger - The Man Behind the Miracle (documentary, 2016),
TV ShowsLate Show with David Letterman (2009), CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley (2011), NBC's People of the Year (2009), Untamed & Uncut: Mayhem and Miracles (2009)
#Trademark
1Miracle on the Hudson
#Quote
1[when asked, "When the birds struck, the engines stopped operating, is that correct?"] [deadpan] They certainly were not capable of producing usable thrust. [interviewed in Air & Space Smithsonian magazine, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
2[when asked, "Did the airplane have a ditch button?"] Yes, it's called a ditching push button. And there was not time. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian magazine, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
3I can remember at 5 years old knowing that I was going to fly airplanes. And I was just fortunate enough at every juncture to be able to get to the next goal. I'm not sure what I would have done had I not been able to fly. I never even considered anything else. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian magazine, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
4My view of the world is that people are best served when they find their passion early on, because we tend to be good at things we're passionate about. I think we also need to find people whom we admire and try to emulate them. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian magazine, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
5My first flight instructor, L.T. Cook Jr., was a Civilian Pilot Training Program instructor during World War II, a real gentleman and a stick-and-rudder man. He was a crop-duster and had his own grass strip in rural Texas. In 1967, I paid $6 an hour for the airplane and gas and $3 an hour for his time. Among the thousands of cards I received [after the ditching], I discovered one from his widow. She wrote, "L.T. wouldn't be surprised, but he certainly would be pleased and proud." [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian magazine, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
6I knew the altitude and airspeed were relatively low, so our total energy available was not great. I also knew we were headed away from LaGuardia, and I knew that to return to LaGuardia I would have to take into account the distance and the altitude necessary to make the turn back. In the case of Teterboro, I knew that was even farther away, even though we were headed in that direction. ... Based on my experience and looking out the window, I could tell by the altitude and the descent rate that neither [airport] was a viable option. I also thought that I could not afford to choose wrongly. I could not afford to attempt to make it to a runway that, in fact, I could not make. Landing short, even by a little bit, can have catastrophic consequences, not only for everybody on the airplane, but for people on the ground. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River, on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
7Our descent rate was more rapid than usual because we had essentially no thrust. So in order to maintain a safe flying speed, we had to have the nose far enough down that we could hold that speed as we descended. Of course that resulted in a higher-than-normal rate of descent. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways' Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
8Once we had established our plan, once we knew our only viable option was to land in the river, we knew we could make the landing. But a lot of things yet had to go right. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after Thursday, January 15th, 2009's successful guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson Rriver on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
9One of the big differences in flying heavy jets versus flying lighter, smaller aircraft is energy management - always knowing at any part of the flight what the most desirable flight path is, then trying to attain that in an elegant way with the minimum thrust, so that you never are too high or too low or too fast or too slow. I've always paid attention to that, and I think that more than anything else helped me. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
10The way I describe this whole experience - and I haven't had time to reflect on it sufficiently - is that everything I had done in my career had in some way been a preparation for that moment. There were probably some things that were more important than others or that applied more directly. But I felt like everything I'd done in some way contributed to the outcome - of course, along with [the actions of] my first officer and the flight attendant crew, the cooperative behavior of the passengers during the evacuation, and the prompt and efficient response of the first responders in New York. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading of the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
11[when asked about how the flight attendants helped, after he announced "Brace for impact"] I felt they were assisting me in that moment. Even though we were intensely focused and very busy, I remember thinking that as soon as I made the public address announcement in the cabin, within a second or two, I heard, even through the hardened cockpit door, the flight attendants in unison shouting their commands. "Heads down. Stay down." And it was comforting to me to know that they were on the same page, that we were all acting in concert. It made me feel that my hope and my confidence in completing this plan was reasonable and that they knew what needed to be done and were doing their part. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
12[asked whether it was standard procedure for the captain to go back through the cabin after an emergency] I felt that as more of a personal responsibility than a procedural responsibility - which it may be. But I had the time, the aircraft was stable, and I was not concerned that it would suddenly sink. And so I could leave absolutely no possibility of anyone being left behind. I made a thorough search, calling out, "Is anyone there?" to make sure the evacuation was complete, and it was. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
13I would characterize the cockpit as being busy, businesslike, and our cooperation was done largely by observing the other and not communicating directly because of the extreme time pressure. [First officer] Jeff [Skiles] and I worked together seamlessly and very efficiently, very quickly, without directly verbalizing a lot of issues. We were observing the same things, we had the same perceptions, and it was clear to me that he was hearing what I was saying to Air Traffic Control on the radio. He was observing my actions, and I was observing his, and it was immediately obvious to me that his understanding of the situation was the same as mine, and that he was quickly and efficiently taking the steps to do his part. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
14Most of the training that we get is for a situation where you have more time to deal with things. You have time to be more thoughtful, to analyze the situation. Typically what's done these days is for the first officer to be the pilot flying and for the captain to be the pilot monitoring, analyzing and managing the situation. There wasn't time for that. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
15I felt it was like the best of both worlds. I could use my experience, I could look out the window and make a decision about where we were going to go, while he [the first officer] was continuing his effort to restart the engines and hoping that we wouldn't have to land some place other than a runway. He was valiantly trying until the last moment to get the engines started again. [interview in Air & Space Smithsonian, on Wednesday, February 18th, 2009. Interview was 34 days after successfully guiding and leading the falling US Airways' Flight 1549 into the Hudson River on Thursday, January 15th, 2009]
#Fact
1Former U.S. Air Force fighter pilot.
2Founder, Safety Reliability Methods, Inc.
3Became famous as a captain for US Airways after successfully ditching an Airbus A320 in the Hudson River on January 15, 2009. His aircraft hit a flock of geese after takeoff, damaging the engines and forcing him to land in the water. All passengers and crew survived.
4CBS News aviation and safety expert.
5Grand Marshal, Tournament of Roses parade.
6Graduated from Denison High School in 1969.
7His wife, Lorrie Sullenberger, is a fitness expert and television personality.
8Lives in Danville, California with his family [2009].
9Graduated from the University of Northern Colorado with a master's in public administration.
10Graduated from Purdue University with a master's in industrial psychology in 1973.
11Graduated from United States Air Force Academy with a B.S.
12Father, with Lorrie Sullenberger, of daughters Kate Sullenberger and Kelly Sullenberger.

Actor

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Late Show with David Letterman2009TV SeriesElevator Expert #1

Writer

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Sully2016based on the book "Highest Duty" by - as Chesley 'Sully' Sullenberger

Self

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Moment by Moment: Averting Disaster on the Hudson2016Video documentary shortHimself
Sully: Neck Deep in the Hudson: - Shooting Sully2016Video documentary shortHimself
Sully: Sully Sullenberger - The Man Behind the Miracle2016Video documentary shortHimself
CBS This Morning2012-2016TV SeriesHimself - CBS News Aviation and Safety Expert / Himself
Jimmy Kimmel Live!2016TV SeriesHimself - Guest
The Late Show with Stephen Colbert2016TV SeriesHimself
WGN Morning News2016TV SeriesHimself
Good Morning America2016TV SeriesHimself
Entertainment Tonight2016TV SeriesHimself
Face the Nation2014-2016TV SeriesHimself
The Insider2015TV SeriesHimself
CNN NewsCenter2014TV Series documentaryHimself - Flight Expert
CNN Newsroom2014TV SeriesHimself - Flight Expert
Newsnight2014TV SeriesHimself - Interviewee
Oprah: Where Are They Now?2013TV SeriesHimself
Fox and Friends2013TV SeriesHimself
Home & Family2013TV SeriesHimself - Guest
Horizon2013TV Series documentaryHimself - Aviation Safety Expert
Tavis Smiley2012TV SeriesHimself - Guest
The Talk2012TV SeriesHimself - Guest
Surfing the Healthcare Tsunami: Bring Your Best Board2012TV Movie documentaryHimself
The Early Show2011TV SeriesHimself - Aviation and Safety Expert
CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley2011TV SeriesHimself - Aviation and Safety Expert
Real Time with Bill Maher2011TV SeriesHimself
World's Scariest Plane Landings2011TV Series documentaryHimself - Captain, Flight 1549
Brace for Impact: The Chesley B. Sullenberger Story2010TV Movie documentaryHimself
Menschen, Bilder, Emotionen2009TV Series documentaryHimself
Untamed & Uncut2009TV Series documentaryHimself
NBC's People of the Year2009TV SpecialHimself
The Tonight Show with Conan O'Brien2009TV SeriesHimself
The Daily Show2009TV SeriesHimself
Today2009TV SeriesHimself
Late Show with David Letterman2009TV SeriesHimself - Guest
NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt2009TV SeriesHimself
60 Minutes2009TV Series documentaryHimself - Captain (segment "Saving Flight 1549")
Extra2009TV SeriesHimself

Archive Footage

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Fox and Friends2016TV SeriesHimself
When Vacations Attack2011TV SeriesHimself
Air Emergency2011TV Series documentaryHimself
The Jay Leno Show2009TV SeriesHimself
Capitalism: A Love Story2009DocumentaryHimself
60 Minutes2009TV Series documentaryHimself - Captain (segment "Saving Flight 1549")
Miracle of the Hudson Plane Crash2009TV Movie documentaryHimself - US Airways Flight 1549 Pilot
Glenn Beck2009TV SeriesHimself

Known for movies


Source
IMDB Wikipedia

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